Heritage Lamb is in the Locker and on the Menu Tomorrow

Shepherds Lamb – Navajo Country & Mountains of New Mexico
One of Heritage Foods’ Farms

Lamb on the Menu

Friday and this weekend

When it comes to sourcing for our whole animal program, we like local, but we also like to support worthwhile traditional producers that are presented to us from Heritage Foods.  It’s a company that grew out of the Slow Food movement, sourcing meat from small American farms. We’ve gotten close to them over the years. Chef Jonah has visited some of their farmers in the mid-west, and we’re excited to offer one of their lambs.

The upside of getting the whole lamb is you’re able to get some great animals when they are at their best. The down side is that they’re frequently in very limited supply. We only have one lamb and we’ll be moving through it (on the menu) starting tomorrow night and through the weekend.

We’ll start by braising the shoulders with stock and aromatics for a ragu, and then Saturday and Sunday we’ll get into grilling the middle cuts, the loins and sirloins. Legs on Monday. Again, limited supply, be forgiving if we run out.

We hope you’ll join us.

Reserve Online or Call 510.547.5356

Tamarack Sheep Farm – Corinth, Vermont

Another one of Heritage Foods’ Farms

This Just In: Magruder Lamb, Three Ways

Photo courtesy of Magruder Ranch

A yearling ram has come in from our favorite grass-fed animal supplier, Magruder Ranch in Potter Valley. These yearlings are just the best lamb we know of. Chef Jonah’s making a triple delight with roast porterhouse, a traditional Merguez sausage, and an olive-crusted chop. Accompanied by long-cooked Walla Walla onions, Fava beans, and salmoriglio (a condiment of lemon, garlic, and herbs), it’s an earthy, sumptuous dish that showcases the true flavor of this prized meat.

Magruder Ranch is a fifth-generation ranch known for its die-hard approach to grass-fed meat. Lambs are born on pasture and are fattened on it under the careful watch of sheepdogs like Buddy, pictured above.

We’ll be serving Magruder lamb through the weekend, or until we run out. Stop in and try it with a delicate glass of nebbiolo from our extensive list.

Make a Reservation

2017-09-12T15:46:36+00:00May 27th, 2016|Coming up..., Events|0 Comments

Mutton of a Bygone Era

 

The mutton the cook Mrs. Patmore so proudly served on the Downton Abbey table is of a higher order rarely available to us, but it will be on the Oliveto menu tomorrow and Friday.

 

According to Mac Magruder, from whose ranch these animals have come, mutton (sheep over 1 year old) was once prized. But it suffered some unjust criticism during WWI and WWII, when sheep was raised primarily for wool, and some of what was sold as mutton was very old – several years, even. It was a time when all sheep was sold and eaten, due to the food shortages during that period.

 

After the wars, meat became the primary product again, and wool became secondary, so sheep began to be processed at a younger age. Mutton became rare, and its high regard was lost (a casualty of war).

 

So what we have here is an uncommon treat. The flavor will be deeper, the omega fatty acid content higher – the sort of meat that was once cherished over a century ago.

 

We’ve recently received four sheep from Magruder Ranch, one of which is particularly special and delicious. It’s a “wether”, a neutered male that’s been kept in the flock for a year and a half. Magruder’s sheep is generally processed at 6-8 months – a bit younger.

 

Here’s what we’re planning:

 

Chef Jonah will be smoking and curing the legs of the wether – like prosciutto – and they will be ready in five or six months. The rest of the wether – along with the three other Magruder yearlings we recently acquired – will be served in a trio upstairs. A portion of leg muscle from the younger yearlings will be cooked rare and served alongside tenderloin or loin and lamb chop.

 

Tortellini of lamb in lamb brodo will be featured on our menu too.

 

This Just In: Magruder Ranch Lamb

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It’s hard to find meat as good as Mac Magruder’s lamb, so we’re pretty excited when we can get it.  We received four yearlings last week. Jonah has let them hang for a few days and is planning to prepare them to you beginning Friday and throughout the weekend.
 
On the menu: 
Roast leg of Magruder lamb with turmeric yogurt, pickled red onion, yellow Finn potatoes, and watercress. Saturday and Sunday, we’ll be adding lamb cappellacci and very large lamb-stuffed ravioli as well.

Come celebrate the Warriors (with a little lamb juice running down your chin)!

This Just In: Grass-fed Lamb, Beef, and Pork from Magruder Ranch

Reese the watchdog guards the flock. Photo courtesy of Magruder Ranch

Reese the watchdog guards the flock. Photo courtesy of Magruder Ranch

Four yearling lambs and a four hundred-pound sow have arrived from one of our favorite purveyors, Magruder Ranch in Potter Valley. Soon, a steer will also be coming our way.

Currently, Magruder Ranch is lush and green, and the young lambs have been feasting on clover and annual grasses that have awoken now that winter is over.

“Beginning in March, when the days get longer, the grass has more strength, and it’s easier for the lambs, which fed on mother’s milk over the winter, to gain weight. When spring comes around they really blossom,” says Mac, the ranch’s owner. As Patricia Unterman once said in her article for the San Francisco Examiner, they are “particularly succulent, whispering of pasture.”

The abundance of green grass his animals have access to means a high level of Omega-3s, the heart-healthy fat found in foods like olive oil and avocado.

We have big plans for our meat. This weekend we’ll be making salumi with the sow. We will work with our steer piece by piece over time. For now, look for cappellaci, a stuffed pasta filled with lamb, with asparagus and pecorino cheese.

This Just In: Magruder Lamb

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The kitchen just received more gorgeous lamb from Magruder Ranch.
Pasture born and pasture raised, the lamb at Magruder Ranch are on strict rotation schedule and spend their days grazing on a 100% pasture diet of white and red clover, rye grass, fescue, sour dock, plantain, harding grass, and orchard grass, with the occasional thistle thrown in.

Leg of lamb will hit the menu tonight and then the kitchen will move into loin, rack, and tender (possibly sausage) by the weekend.

Sunday Supper menu for August 17, 2014

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Prix fixe $40.

Served family-style. For groups of one to twelve. Whole table must order prix fixe menu.

(Please note that wine and gratuity are not included.)

call 510-547-5356 or reserve online

Larger parties: please let us know at the time of your reservation if your table will be ordering the Sunday Supper menu so that we can plan accordingly. Thanks!

2017-09-12T15:47:15+00:00August 16th, 2014|2014, Events, Happened already...|0 Comments

Sunday Supper menu for August 10, 2014

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Antipasto
Stuffed squash blossom with Costata Romanesco squash salad

Primo
Ravioli of Magruder lamb

Secondo
Brasato of rabbit with peperonata

Dolce
Nectarine galette with honey ice cream

Prix fixe $40.

Served family-style. For groups of one to twelve. Whole table must order prix fixe menu.

(Please note that wine and gratuity are not included.)

call 510-547-5356 or reserve online

Larger parties: please let us know at the time of your reservation if your table will be ordering the Sunday Supper menu so that we can plan accordingly. Thanks!

2017-09-12T15:47:15+00:00August 8th, 2014|2014, Events, Happened already...|0 Comments